Stonehenge, England

Stonehenge, Home of Magic, Druids and Pagan Rituals

One of my first great adventures was exploring England, nearly ten years ago. Very high on my England Travel wish-list was definitely the much speculated about Stonehenge. It is one of the mystical places where it seems nobody actually knows what it was used for or by whom it was built. It is surrounded in mystery and your imagination can run wild with all the … Continue reading Stonehenge, Home of Magic, Druids and Pagan Rituals

War Memorial Museum in Seoul

Glimpse of War and South Korea

The history of Korea is filled with wars. Korea has suffered from many attacks by Mongolians, Chinese and Japanese, but has always survived. The War Memorial Museum in Seoul gave me a glimpse of the turbulent history that Koreans have been through. There were some very interesting information inside and the military tanks and planes outside were quite stunning to see and have a closer look … Continue reading Glimpse of War and South Korea

Gyeongbokgung palace

Seoul, a glimpse into the heart of South Korea

During January ’08 I taught English at a winter camp in South Korea. The school was in the South so I only got to explore Seoul for a weekend. My month in South-Korea was very interesting and definitely a culture shock but not a place I would like to live in for too long. I was offered a longer contract after my winter camp finished but … Continue reading Seoul, a glimpse into the heart of South Korea

Castle Of Good Hope

Exploring South Africa’s oldest colonial building

I took my family on the hop on hop off red bus tour of Cape Town and one of the main stops was the Castle Of Good Hope. I actually live just down the street from the Castle, a star or pentagonal  shaped fort built in the 17th century here in Cape Town, South Africa. Its position, although unremarkable today, indicates the original position of the shoreline, which, thanks … Continue reading Exploring South Africa’s oldest colonial building

Weekly photo challenge: Creepy in Cambodia

 This week, share an image of something creepy. Unsettling. Eerie. Disgusting. My most unsettling and creepy travel experience was visiting the Killing Fields of Cambodia in Phnom Penh. This mass murder site, where the Khmer Rouge executed about 17,000 people between 1975 and 1979 is definitely very unsettling. The place is filled with mass graves containing thousands of bodies , many of the dead former inmates … Continue reading Weekly photo challenge: Creepy in Cambodia

Throwback Thursday: The Amazing Saint Basil’s Cathedral!!

The first week I was in Moscow I couldnt wait to explore the iconic Red square and my wanderings took me into St Basils Cathedral with its ice-cream coloured onion domes. This Cathedral represents Moscow on so many postcards and photos that it has become one of the first things people think of when Moscow is mentioned. This beautiful and very colourful Cathedral was erected over the … Continue reading Throwback Thursday: The Amazing Saint Basil’s Cathedral!!

Weekly Photo Challenge: Symmetry – Egypt

Symmetry. Architecture that is balanced in its use of lines and shapes creating rhythms in the structure.  These are the magnificent pillars found at Luxor Temple in Egypt. Its amazing what can be built without the help of technology.   New to The Daily Post? Whether you’re a beginner or a professional, you’re invited to get involved in our Weekly Photo Challenge to help you meet your blogging goals and give you another way to take part … Continue reading Weekly Photo Challenge: Symmetry – Egypt

Red is Leister Square

Wordless Wednesday: Red is Leicester Square

Leicester Square is London’s home of entertainment. This is where you can enjoy a west end show, an international cinema premiere, relax in one of the many hotels, restaurants and bars or visit one of London’s top attractions. With Trafalgar Square to the south, Piccadilly Circus to the west, China Town to the north and Covent Garden to the east, Leicester Square is right in … Continue reading Wordless Wednesday: Red is Leicester Square

The largest outdoor theater of the Ancient World

The largest outdoor theater of the Ancient World

Ephesus which was established as a port, used to be the most important commercial or trade centre of the ancient world due to its very fertile valley and its strategic location. It was definitely a magnificent city during its prime and was filled with many important structures. The city was not only famed for the Temple of Artemis or the Library of Celsus but also for its theater which … Continue reading The largest outdoor theater of the Ancient World

Temple of Hadrian

The remains of the Temple of Hadrian

Another treasure to be found at Ephesus is the remains of the Temple of Hadrian. It is quite spectacular that any of this beautiful temple has survived through the destructive history of what once was a magnificent city. An inscription shows that the Temple of Hadrian  was erected around 118 AD but underwent repairs in the 4th century and has been re-erected from surviving fragments. The facade of … Continue reading The remains of the Temple of Hadrian

Library of Celsus in Ephesus

The Library of Celsus in Ephesus

One of the most recognized and most famous buildings of the ancient city of Ephesis is the Library of Celsus. Before traveling to Turkey and reading up on the history of this ancient city I admit that I thought this Library was the most significant part of Ephesus. I quickly learned that it is the one structure that is most in tact although other buildings like … Continue reading The Library of Celsus in Ephesus

Memmius Monument

Ephesus home to one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

When visiting Ephesus in Turkey I was greeted by the remains of a magnificent ancient culture and people of which today nearly nothing remains. Ephesus was an ancient Greek city on the coast of Ionia, three kilometers southwest of present-day Selçuk. It was built in the 10th century BC on the site of the former  Arzawan capital by Attic and Ionian Greek colonists. According to myth the founder of Ephesus was a prince of Athens named Androklos, who … Continue reading Ephesus home to one of the Seven Wonders of the Ancient World

Hagia Sophia

Hagia Sophia, Turkeys’ Church-turned-Mosque

Turkey is one of those countries which has changed identity and cultures so many times that it has turned into a unique country with a unique culture. Exploring this culture rich country has been one of my most amazing adventures. The beautiful Hagia Sophia, Turkeys’ Church-turned-Mosque served as the principal mosque of Istanbul, then Constantinople, for almost 500 years. If you ever get to visit … Continue reading Hagia Sophia, Turkeys’ Church-turned-Mosque

The Blue Mosque

The Blue Mosque isn’t Blue?

The Sultan Ahmed Mosque, facing Aya Sofya and mirroring its domed silhouette,  is popularly known as the Blue Mosque. It is considered to be the last great mosque of the classical period. This huge mosque was build to calm God after the unfavorable result of the war with Persia. The mosque was built from 1609 to 1616 on the site of the palace of the Byzantine emperors, so big … Continue reading The Blue Mosque isn’t Blue?

Interior view of the Hagia Sophia, showing Islamic elements on the top of the main dome.

Exploring the interior of Hagia Sophia, Turkeys’ Church-turned-Mosque

If you ever get to visit Istanbul you have to make a point of exploring Hagia Sofia, the church-turned-mosque. Not only is it unique in this aspect it is also one of the greatest surviving examples of Byzantine architecture in Turkey. It is one of those places you will have to visit more than once as it is so overwhelming that you cant take everything … Continue reading Exploring the interior of Hagia Sophia, Turkeys’ Church-turned-Mosque

Hagia Sophia, Turkeys' Church-turned-Mosque

Hagia Sophia, Turkeys’ Church-turned-Mosque

Turkey is one of those countries which has changed identity and cultures so many times that it has turned into a unique country with a unique culture. I couldn’t wait to explore this culture rich country and there is no better place to start than in Istanbul, once named Constantinople. After checking into my hotel in the old quarter I immediately found my way over … Continue reading Hagia Sophia, Turkeys’ Church-turned-Mosque

The Colourful Bo-Kaap of Cape Town

The Colourful Bo-Kaap of Cape Town

The Bo-Kaap is definitely the most colorful part of Cape Town and a great place to explore. I think I wouldnt mind living in one of these brightly coloured houses either. This part of the city, situated on the slopes of Signal Hill above the city center was formerly known as the Malay Quarter. They have a lovely view over the city especially at night. The colourful Bo-Kaap with its romantic cobble … Continue reading The Colourful Bo-Kaap of Cape Town

Entrances to Angkor Thom

The Grandiose Entrances to Angkor Thom

Angkor Thom (Big Angkor) is a 3km walled and moated royal city and was the last capital of the Angkorian Empire. There are five entrances or gates in to this city. There is a gate at each cardinal point leading you to the Royal Palace and we actually got to visit three of these gates. Although I can not quite remember which one was the … Continue reading The Grandiose Entrances to Angkor Thom

Cu Chi Tunnels

Firing AK 47’s and Claustrophobic Underground tunnels in Vietnam

No trip to Vietnam will be complete without visiting the famous underground Cu Chi tunnels. It is as huge a part of Vietnam’s history as its temples and pagodas. These underground tunnels were the Viet Cong’s (Vietnamese guerrilla army) base of operations, where they lived and fought from during the Vietnam War. As a child I used to watch countless of “war” movies with my father and a lot of these were about … Continue reading Firing AK 47’s and Claustrophobic Underground tunnels in Vietnam

Wat Phnom

Phnom Pehn, Cambodia’s city of Genocide, Temples and Palaces.

I know Phnom Pehn is not at the top of everybody’s sightseeing list but I think it is an absolute must see for its history and even its culture. Phnom Pehn is a chaotic, dirty city filled with people who try to swindle you out of your money if you dont know how to barter, se be careful. Getting a motorbike taxi or a tuc-tuc … Continue reading Phnom Pehn, Cambodia’s city of Genocide, Temples and Palaces.

York Minster Cathedral

York Minster, England is one of the world’s largest Medieval Gothic Cathedrals

York in itself is a beautiful city but York Minster is actually one of England’s most popular attractions. This Gothic Cathedral is also one of the largest of its kind in Northern Europe.  York Minster was voted one of the UK’s Seven Wonders by visitors in 2002. This cathedral was one of the first places in York that I got to explore and I think I actually … Continue reading York Minster, England is one of the world’s largest Medieval Gothic Cathedrals

The Shambles in York, UK

The “Shambles” is the most photographed street in England!.

If one street could exemplify York in England, its character, beauty and incredibly rich history, then it is  definitely the Shambles. Setting foot on the ancient cobbles I was greeted by the bustling hubbub of locals and tourists, it looked like this is THE place to be when you are in York. Even before I entered the famous little street called the Shambles I stopped … Continue reading The “Shambles” is the most photographed street in England!.

Roman Baths

The City Bath is a piece of Roman history in England

Roman baths were part of the day-to-day life for Romans and  Bath in Somerset, England has one of the best examples of a Roman bath complex in Europe. I got to walk past these Baths every day on my way to work and couldn’t wait to explore them with my friends. The Roman Baths themselves are actually well below the modern street level. We entered … Continue reading The City Bath is a piece of Roman history in England

Bath Abbey

Bath Abbey is built on a mass grave

Moving anywhere new is scary and if you don’t know the place or anybody living there it makes it even scarier. The first time I actually moved somewhere where I didn’t know a soul was to Bath in the UK. I moved into a shared flat right next to the river and across the street from the Beautiful Bath Abbey. I arrived mid autumn and … Continue reading Bath Abbey is built on a mass grave

Kensington Palace

London’s 300 Year Old Kensington Palace was even Diana’s Royal Home

During April in England you expect it to be wet and maybe cold but not freezing!! I had on my “Russian Winter” coat and was so glad that I remembered to bring a pair of gloves with me for my day of exploring in London. Spring was not far away but there was no sign of it and as we walked through the park to … Continue reading London’s 300 Year Old Kensington Palace was even Diana’s Royal Home