Exploring China’s Temple of Heaven where they Performed Sacrifices for Good Harvests

Temple of Heaven
Entering the Temple of Heaven through the South Gate

During our fabulous China Odyssey tour we got to visit a couple of different temples and shrines but the Temple of Heaven ended up being my favourite.

The Temple of Heaven, literally translated as the Altar of is a complex of religious buildings situated in the southeastern part of central Beijing. The temple complex was constructed from 1406 to 1420 during the reign of the Yongle EmperorThe complex was visited by the Emperors of the Ming and Qing dynasties for annual ceremonies of prayer to Heaven for good harvest. It has been regarded as a Taoist temple, although Chinese Heaven worship, especially by the reigning monarch of the day, pre-dates Taoism.

Circular Mound Altar
The huge marble Circular Mound Altar
The  three levels of marble stones were decorated by lavishly carved dragons
The three levels of marble stones were decorated by lavishly carved dragons

I was so excited to get to explore this round temple situated on its round platforms all built out of marble. As we entered the Temple of Heaven from the south the first thing we came across were the Circular Mound Altar, the altar proper. It is an empty circular platform on three levels of marble stones, each decorated by lavishly carved dragons. The numbers of various elements of the Altar, including its balusters and steps, are either the sacred number nine or its multiples.

The center of the altar is a round slate called the Heart of Heaven or the Supreme Yang, where the Emperor prayed for favorable weather. Thanks to the design of the altar, the sound of the prayer will be reflected by the guardrail, creating significant resonance, which was supposed to help the prayer communicate with the Heaven. The whole altar was a bit crowded but I eventually  got to stand right on the sacrifice stone! It is told that they used to sacrifice animals here but I also heard stories that during some ceremonies they actually sacrificed people.

 right on the sacrifice stone
Me standing right on the sacrifice stone
Circular Mound Altar
Mom and I next to the Circular Mound Altar

In ancient China, the Emperor of China was regarded as the Son of Heaven, who administered earthly matters on behalf of, and representing, heavenly authority. To be seen to be showing respect to the source of his authority, in the form of sacrifices to heaven, was extremely important. The temple was built for these ceremonies, mostly comprising prayers for good harvests.

Twice a year the Emperor and all his retinue would move from the Forbidden city through Beijing to encamp within the complex, wearing special robes and abstaining from eating meat. No ordinary Chinese was allowed to view this procession or the following ceremony. In the temple complex the Emperor would personally pray to Heaven for good harvests. The highpoint of the ceremony at the winter solstice was performed by the Emperor on the Earthly Mount. The ceremony had to be perfectly completed; it was widely held that the smallest of mistakes would constitute a bad omen for the whole nation in the coming year.

 

The Imperial Vault of Heaven
The Imperial Vault of Heaven

The Imperial Vault of Heaven is a single-gabled circular building, built on a single level of marble stone base. It is surrounded by a smooth circular wall, the Echo Wall, that can transmit sounds over large distances. We tried it out but unfortunately the area was too crowded for the sound to carry.

The Imperial Vault of Heaven
The Imperial Vault of Heaven

The Imperial Vault is connected to the Hall of Prayer by the Vermilion Steps Bridge, a 360 meter long raised walkway that slowly ascends from the Vault to the Hall of Prayer.

Vermilion Steps Bridge,
The Vermilion Steps Bridge

Vermilion Steps Bridge,
Me on the Vermilion Steps Bridge,
The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests
The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests is a magnificent triple-gabled circular building, 36 meters in diameter and 38 meters tall, built on three levels of marble stone base, where the Emperor prayed for good harvests. The building is completely wooden, with no nails.

The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests has four inner, twelve middle and twelve outer pillars, representing the four seasons, twelve months and twelve traditional Chinese hours respectively. Combined together, the twelve middle and twelve outer pillars represent the traditional solar term.

The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests
The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests

Some interesting temple symbolisms where Earth was represented by a square and Heaven by a circle.  Several features of the temple complex symbolize the connection of Heaven and Earth, of circle and square. The whole temple complex is surrounded by two cordons of walls; the outer wall has a taller, semi-circular northern end, representing Heaven, and a shorter, rectangular southern end, representing the Earth. Both the Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests and the Circular Mound Altar are round, each standing on a square yard, again representing Heaven and Earth.

The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests
The Hall of Prayer for Good Harvests
All the buildings within the Temple have special dark blue roof tiles
All the buildings within the Temple have special dark blue roof tiles

All the buildings within the Temple have special dark blue roof tiles, representing the Heaven.

The Temple of Heaven was inscribed as a UNESCO World Heritage Site in 1998 and was described as “a masterpiece of architecture and landscape design which simply and graphically illustrates a cosmogony of great importance for the evolution of one of the world’s great civilizations…” as the “symbolic layout and design of the Temple of Heaven had a profound influence on architecture and planning in the Far East over many centuries.” 

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19 comments

  1. Very interesting information and great photos! I find it interesting how the Earth was represented with a square and the Sky/Heaven with a circle.

    I am also curious as to why are the altar elements nine or a multiple of nine, what is the significance of it?

    Great post, I love reading and learning about all these places!

    Like

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