How do you celebrate your birthday when it is -30 degrees outside? You go down into Stalin’s secret bunker and go for a ride on Moscow’s circle line.

Belorusskaya

Belorusskaya was opened in 1938, the station is named after the nearby Belorussky Rail Terminal, from which westward trains towards Belarus and western Europe depart.

The station is decorated with national Belarusian motives. Bronze floor-lamps decorate the pillars and at the end of the central hall is a bust of Vladimir Lenin.
Presently about 139,700 passengers pass through this station per day.

Krasnopresnenskaya

 Krasnopresnenskaya was opened on 14 March 1954. The station has red granite pillars with white marble cornices and 14 brass plaques. Eight of them depict the events of the Russian Revolution of 1905 and the other six show scenes from the Russian Revolution of 1917.

Kievskaya

It is named after the nearby Kiyevsky Rail Terminal. The design for the station was chosen in an open competition held in Ukraine.

Kievskaya metro station

Kievskaya metro station

Kievskaya features low, square pillars with white marble and large mosaics celebrating Russo-Ukrainian unity. Both the mosaics and the arches between the pylons are edged with elaborate gold-coloured trim. At the end of the platform is a huge portrait of Lenin.

At the end of the platform is a huge portrait of Lenin

Kievskaya metro station

Kievskaya metro station

Platform of Kievskaya metro station

Unfortunately Park Kultury metro station was closed for repairs.
The following 3 metro stations: Oktyabr’skaya, Dobryninskaya and Paveletskaya are the only stations on the circle line that I think is not worth a visit.

I had a great day experiencing Russian architecture and learning a bit more about Moscow!!

Had a fabulous time exploring Moscow’s metro system!!